Distinguished Lecture Series

Annual events, correlated to topics that support the College’s mission to educate for excellence in health care practice, leadership and the continuous acquisition of knowledge.

DR. LOUISE ARONSON – Reading Old Age: Medicine, Literature, and Life’s Third Act

Thursday, November 1, at 7:30 p.m.
High Auditorium at Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences, 850 Greenfield Rd., Lancaster

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

In health sciences and health care, we focus on evidence in the medical literature and pay much less attention to individual experiences, or how we come to ask some questions and tell some stories but not others. In contrast, Literature (with a big L) is often thought of as everything from the classics you read in high school English, to some of the best, beautifully written essays and books of today. All literature can help provide social context, helping us question assumptions and enter into the other people’s lives.

This “edutainment” style talk will use images, quotations and various types of literature to explore one of the most important and fastest growing areas of health science: old age. The talk will help people see and understand aging more accurately, the first step in providing high-quality care to older patients. The speaker will explore medicine’s fraught relationship with old age, what works well, what doesn’t, and what matters most in life’s third act, as well as how reading and writing by and about key patient populations can inform clinical practice and relationships in critical ways.

Dr. Louise Aronson is a Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) where she cares for frail older adults in the Care at Home Program and directs the Northern California Geriatrics Education Center and UCSF Medical Humanities. Louise’s research and scholarship focus on geriatrics education, reflective learning, and Public Medical Communication. Louise is also a writer and has won the Sonora Review Prize, the New Millennium Short Fiction Award, and three Pushcart nominations. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Narrative Magazine, the Bellevue Literary Review, the Lancet, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the San Francisco Chronicle, among other publications. Her first book, A History of the Present Illness, was a finalist for the Chautauqua Prize and the PEN American Bingham award for best debut fiction.

Credit Designation:
The Lancaster General Hospital designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Accreditation Statement:
The Lancaster General Hospital is accredited by the Pennsylvania Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

This course is approved for 1.5 continuing education hours. Penn Medicine Nursing is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval # 124-3-H-15.

Commercial Support:
This activity is not commercially supported. The event planners report having no actual or potential conflict of interest in relation to this educational activity. None of the planners have any relevant financial relationships.

Event questions? Contact us at edonovan2@PAcollege.edu.

 


 

As part of the Distinguished Lecture series, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences is also hosting the

National Library of Medicine’s traveling exhibit
“And there’s the humor of it: Shakespeare and the four humors”

According to the National Library of Medicine, “William Shakespeare (1564–1616) created characters that are among the richest and most humanly recognizable in all of literature. Yet Shakespeare understood human personality in the terms available to his age—that of the now-discarded theory of the four bodily humors—blood, bile, melancholy, and phlegm. These four humors were thought to define peoples’ physical and mental health, and determined their personalities, as well.” This exhibit, “explores the language of the four humors that bred the core passions of anger, grief, hope, and fear—the emotions conveyed so powerfully in Shakespeare’s comedies and tragedies.”

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC:
Thursday, November 1, 2018
6:30-9:30 p.m. (prior to the Distinguished Lecture Series event) in the High Auditorium.

Credit Designation:
This event is approved for 0.5 continuing education hours. Penn Medicine Nursing is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval # 124-3-H-15.

For more information, visit http://pacollege.libguides.com/nlmexhibit.